Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 5-

Capillary hemangioma or pyogenic granuloma


Shilpa Trivedi 
 Department of Periodontology, FODS, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Shilpa Trivedi
Department of Periodontology, FODS, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India




How to cite this article:
Trivedi S. Capillary hemangioma or pyogenic granuloma.J Indian Soc Periodontol 2016;20:5-5


How to cite this URL:
Trivedi S. Capillary hemangioma or pyogenic granuloma. J Indian Soc Periodontol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2022 Jun 28 ];20:5-5
Available from: https://www.jisponline.com/text.asp?2016/20/1/5/177427


Full Text

Sir,

I write to you in regards to a case report “extragingival pyogenic granuloma histologically mimicking capillary hemangioma.” Authored by Dahiya and Kathuria [1] published in September–October 2014 issue of your reputed Journal. The authors have described the cases excellently, but I have a slight disagreement.

Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a nonneoplastic tumor of the oral cavity, which shows a predilection for the gingiva. The term PG is now considered a misnomer, as it is not caused by pyogenic organisms and it is not a true granuloma as well.[2]

Histopathologically, PG shows a highly vascular proliferation resembling granulation tissue. Numerous small and large endothelium lined blood vessels engorged by red blood cells are often seen. The channels are often organized in a lobular arrangement thus deriving the term “lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH).” Some pathologists consider PG as a polypoid form of capillary hemangioma or an inflamed lobular hemangioma while others consider it as granulation – tissue type hemangioma.[3]

Two histologic variants of PG have been described: LCH and nonlobular capillary hemangioma (non-LCH). The first type has proliferating blood vessels arranged in lobular aggregates although there may not be any edema, capillary dilation or granulation tissue proliferation. The non-LCH has a highly vascular proliferation resembling granulation tissue.[2],[3],[4] Varying degrees of inflammatory cells infiltrate are seen in both types of PG.

Considering the above facts in mind, it seems that capillary hemangioma may be the histopathologic diagnosis of a case clinically presenting as PG and they may not be two different entities.

References

1Dahiya R, Kathuria A. Extragingival pyogenic granuloma histologically mimicking capillary hemangioma. J Indian Soc Periodontol 2014;18:641-3.
2Neville BM, Damm DD, Allen CM, Bouquot JE. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2002. p. 447-9.
3Bouquot JE, Nilai H. Lesions of the oral cavity. In: Gnepp DR, editor. Diagnostic Surgical Pathology of the Head and Neck. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2001. p. 141-233.
4Thompson LD. Lobular capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma). In: Head and Neck Pathology: Foundations in Diagnostic Pathology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2012.