Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
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EDITORIAL
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 493-494  

Survival of the fittest


Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor & Head, Department of Periodontics, Dental College, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal - 795 004, Manipur, India

Date of Web Publication14-Nov-2020

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Kumar
Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor & Head, Department of Periodontics, Dental College, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal - 795 004, Manipur, India
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jisp.jisp_668_20

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How to cite this article:
Kumar A. Survival of the fittest. J Indian Soc Periodontol 2020;24:493-4

How to cite this URL:
Kumar A. Survival of the fittest. J Indian Soc Periodontol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Dec 1];24:493-4. Available from: https://www.jisponline.com/text.asp?2020/24/6/493/300719





I write this editorial for the last issue of 2020 with a hope that the coming year will be fruitful prosperous, healthy for everyone. In the year gone by, we have witnessed a “once in a lifetime” situation. We all, in this generation, had read about pandemics in public health dentistry books and/or also in history books and may have heard about such calamities from our elders. But the fact is, reading and listening about these things can never give us a fair idea of difficulties and hardships people would have faced in earlier pandemics. The ferocity of such pandemics was far more and effects more devastating in earlier times, as, science, medicine, social media, information technology, transportation were not so developed to the level we see now. Now that we have seen it, felt it, gone through it, we have some (basic) idea of what the pandemic can do, although we can still can never image what would have happened in earlier days. Who, in this generation, would have imagined the “world” coming to stand still!

I sincerely hope that the “worst” is over. As situation in every field improves, our profession will be back on track with the same glory. At least, one good thing what this pandemic has taught us is, to be ready for the worst and be very religious in following sterilization and disinfection protocols while practicing dentistry.

I also hope that we will prepare ourselves for such future calamities in a way that our profession does not come to standstill again. We are an integral part of health profession. When medical profession didn't come to stand still, why should dentistry be affected. Only reason I see why our profession came to such a sudden slowdown is because of indifferent attitude towards sterilization and disinfection and overdose of misinformation on social media.

Also, Periodontology in particular will also start shining again with one more virus being added to long list of viruses to be investigated for its role in pathogenesis of periodontitis. We need to develop definitive protocols and standard operating procedures to follow during such pandemics, so that we can go ahead with our regular practice of periodontics. We need to have knowledge and access to proven and effective protective gears which would be efficient against such viruses.

Also, we need to work on how to reduce splatter and aerosol production during our basic procedure of scaling. We might see development of new equipments or techniques where in scaling could be done with minimum amount of splatter/aerosol products.

We need to investigate about chemical disinfection which can reduce the microbial load and is effective against the virus creating mayhem now. When we have protocols to follow for diseases like HIV, Hepatitis etc., and we do perform procedure in individuals with such diseases, why should we not be able to perform procedures in asymptomatic untested COVID – 19 patients.

COVID-19 might have or may become integral part of system in future and soon realize that all the dentists are enquiring about it while taking medical history as we do for hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular and other diseases.

More worrying is what next?. No one can predict what will hit the humanity again and in what form? We cannot afford to apply emergency brakes to our profession every time we face any such catastrophe. We need to be prepared and keep ourselves ready to fight and find a way to get out of any such situation without our profession being affected.

”Survival of the fittest”, a phrase that originated from Darwin's theory of Evolution in 1869, which stated that the continued existence of only those organisms will be observed which are best adapted to their environment.

The nature has supplemented our theoretical knowledge of Darwin's theory with a practical experience, which have its implication in current scenario, to make us understand the real meaning of the term “Survival of the fittest”.

Be prepared for next pandemic well in advance, if there will be one… becausefittest have been able to survive this disease in 'literal' terms and otherwise.

”Survival of the fittest” and “Being Negative” is the current mantra to follow…






 

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