Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
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EDITORIAL
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 373-374  

An ode to kirkland flap… obituary to modified widman flap


Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor, Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dental Studies and Technologies, Kadrabad, Modinagar - 201 201, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication3-Sep-2018

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Kumar
Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor, Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dental Studies and Technologies, Kadrabad, Modinagar - 201 201, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jisp.jisp_501_18

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How to cite this article:
Kumar A. An ode to kirkland flap… obituary to modified widman flap. J Indian Soc Periodontol 2018;22:373-4

How to cite this URL:
Kumar A. An ode to kirkland flap… obituary to modified widman flap. J Indian Soc Periodontol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 17];22:373-4. Available from: http://www.jisponline.com/text.asp?2018/22/5/373/240348





There was a time not so long ago…when it was compulsory for all the post-graduate students to perform the Modified Widman flap (MWF) surgery during their post-graduate (PG) course. Head of the departments would make sure that their students practice MWF on enough number of cases (where indicated) to hone their skills before the PG could demonstrate the ability to his examiners and later on use the same ability and expertise to provide best of treatment to his or her patients.

Also, there was a time, not so long ago…. when it was compulsory for a PG student to select a case indicated for MWF surgery for his final exam clinicals. The case selection criteria was stringent and it was expected from the student that the patient who has to undergo MWF during exams should have a full set of teeth, including third molars.

The first incision, the removal of lining, removed gingival collar and the fine smooth thin margins are always a sight to adore (if executed properly). This type of performance in an examination and demonstration of such skills could give a fair idea to examiners about the proficiency of the students.

Times change. So do the choices. The students do not want to perform surgeries where their skills would be tested. “Easy” is the way out. A penchant to make easier choice has crept in. At least from surgical point of view nothing can be easier to execute than Kirkland flap. So every student wants to perform a Kirkland flap during his or her exams. And the only reason for opting Kirkland flap is “esthetics,” as cited by students. As if removal of 0.5 mm of gingival collar will cause an upheaval in the esthetics of a person who is suffering from chronic periodontitis- for a person who was never concerned for the health of periodontium and teeth and is so worried about esthetics. Is esthetics an “issue” or being used as a scapegoat to avoid MWF. The students are not interested in learning the finer skills of Periodontology. It is a rare sight to see any student perform MWF during exams.

And this change has taken place in last few years…very swiftly.

Who is to blame for this downward shift? Teachers or students…. I have no sides to take. We need to introspect to what level have teachers gone wrong and to what level have students made a mistake. But the students are students and are bound to make mistakes but it is the duty of teachers to take remedial measures at right time.

Can generally students do something in post-graduation, which their teacher does not want? The answer is No.

“Are we failing our students” by allowing them to take an easy way out and permitting them to do what they want?

The periodontists who themselves have never practiced MWF during their training days; don't expect them to have the muscle to direct their students to perform MWF when they take on the mantle of teaching.

Thus from a position of MWF being “de jure” not far back, it has given way to Kirkland flap now becoming “de rigueur”… I am sure history will not forgive us this “retro” shift.

Are we, in our departments, writing a slow obituary to MWF?






 

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